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Helpful advice for family caregivers

Written by: Sameen Junejo

Juggling the demands of a busy life, raising children and supporting your elderly loved ones can be stressful. If you feel stretched and overwhelmed providing day-to-day care for your aging parents or loved one, follow these tips that may help keep your stress under control.

1. Practice self-care
It’s essential to maintain your own physical and emotional health. That means eating a balanced diet, getting adequate rest, exercising regularly and taking time for activities that are good for your mental health. Spending time with friends, sharing your feelings and focusing on the positive can also help you endure challenging times. And if someone offers you help, accept it!

2. Talk to others
Family, friends and neighbours are often happy to help with tasks like grocery shopping and cooking. Ask your kids to pitch in with age-appropriate tasks. Join a support group – with other caregivers

3. Research the health condition of your elderly loved one
Gather as much information about your elderly loved one’s condition and treatment options. Collecting information will help you be better prepared to provide them with a tailored care plan.

4. Seek out support
If you find that your parent’s care needs are increasing, Bayshore’s professional caregivers can help. They are Bonded – carefully screened with criminal background checks, well trained and highly skilled and have 24/7 access to a nurse. We offer customized care plans for each and every individual.

For more information on how to select a quality home health care provider, we are pleased to provide you with an overview of questions and checklist that will assist you in this important decision. Click here.

For more details about home health care, call 1-877-289-3997.

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